Stinging Nettle Pesto

nettle.jpg
Nettles, native to Europe and Asia is a plant with tiny little hairs that when touched inject a small amount of formic acid that creates a rather powerful stinging sensation. The sensation will go away after a few hours.

When nettles are boiled the "stinging" property is removed and it leaves a healthy "green" which can be eaten like spinach or in this case made into a pesto.
  • PrepN/A |
  • TotalN/A |
  • Serves 6

Ingredients

    • 6 cups (125g) fresh nettle, blanched in boiling water for a minute (this removes the "sting"), drained and roughly chopped
    • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
    • 1/3 cup (50g) pine nuts
    • 1/2 cup (60g) grated parmesan
    • 1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

Place the blanched nettle, pine nuts, parmesan, and a little salt and pepper, in a food processor. Blend the mixture until the mixture is smooth, scraping down the side occasionally. While the motor is running gradually pour in the olive oil until well distributed.

Place the Pesto in a sterilized jar and pour a little extra olive oil over the top and seal well with a lid. Refrigerate until ready to use. Pesto will keep for up to a month in well sealed jar in the refrigerator.

Additional Notes

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Recipes From GourmetSleuth.com - The Gourmet Food And Cooking Resource