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Convection Oven

convection oven: photo by kitchenaid

Convection Oven Cooking

Here are some tips on making recipe cooking time adjustments when using a convection oven including a chart of adjusted temperatures and cooking times.

Article by: Barbara Bowman


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General Convection Oven Recipe Conversion Guidelines

There are three commonly accepted methods of converting recipes from conventional oven baking to convection oven baking. 

  1. Bake at the same conventional oven temperature but for a shorter period of time.
  2. Bake for the same length of time as you would using a conventional oven but reduce the temperature by 25 degrees.
  3. Bake for a slightly shorter period of time and a reduced temperature.  This tends to be the most successful method for most ovens.

 

When Should Convection Cooking Be Used Rather Than Conventional Cooking

Foods cooked in a convection oven cook about 25% - 30% faster than a conventional oven as the hot air is forced around the food.  Foods tend to have less moisture loss and fewer nutrients are destroyed in the cooking process.

One of the most important factors when determining which cooking method is most appropriate for your food is the type of dish or pan you are cooking in.   If the cooking container blocks the flow of air around the food then there is no use in using convection cooking. 

Convection Cooking Is Good For

  • Cookie sheets
  • Shallow pans

Convential Cooking Is Good For

  • Covered casseroles, pans or dishes
  • Deep roasting pans

More Convection Cooking Tips

Manufacturer Guidelines
Follow the recommendations from the manufacturer of the oven. Your oven typically shipped with a user guide. It is a good idea to familiarized yourself with the specifics for your own oven. If you don't have a user manual then try contacting the manufacture to obtain a copy. Many provide printable copies online.

Air Circulation
Air circulation is important. Don't cover racks with foil. Allow 1 to 1 1/2 inches around pans (also above and below pans for multi-rack baking).

Use Proper Pans
For maximum browning, use pans with low sides, and rimless cookie sheets. Many ovens come with special pans and racks that lift roasts so air flows all around. If possible, place the long sides of the pan parallel to the oven door.

Roasting Guidelines

Roast meats and poultry
Preheating is not necessary. Place meats on a rack in the roasting pan for better browning. Roasting time may be 20 to 30 percent less than in a conventional oven if temperatures aren't reduced. Some ovens offer a special roasting mode that provides top and/or bottom browning or an initial surge in heat in addition to the fan. These modes make it easy to get optimum results in a shorter time.

Small Roasts or Unstuffed Poultry
Do not reduce oven temperatures for small pieces, skinny roasts, or unstuffed poultry. In our tests, we roasted a 3 1/2-pound chicken at 375 |degrees~. In about an hour, about 20 percent less time than for conventional cooking, it was beautifully browned, with succulent flesh.

Dense Roasts & Stuffed Turkeys
For large, dense roasts and big stuffed turkeys, you may need to reduce the temperature 25 |degrees~ during part or all of the roasting time. When you lower the temperature, the meat may be juicier and shrink less, but it will take longer to cook.

Convection Cooking Charts

Method 1:  Reduce temp by 25 to 30 degrees and bake per conventional recipe time

Conventional Oven Temp

Convection
Less 25F

Convection
Less 30F

225

200

195

250

225

220

275

250

245

300

275

270

325

300

295

350

325

320

375

350

345

400

375

370

425

400

395

450

425

420

475

450

445

500

475

470

525

500

495

550

525

520

Method 2:  Bake at conventional oven temperature but reduce cooking time by 25%-30% less

Conventional Baking Time In minutes

25% Less Time

30% Less Time

10

8

7

15

11

10.5

20

15

14

25

19

17.5

30

23

21

35

26

24.5

40

30

28

45

34

31.5

50

38

35

55

41

38.5

60

45

42

65

49

45.5

70

53

49

75

56

52.5

80

60

56

85

64

59.5

90

68

63

95

71

66.5

100

75

70

105

79

73.5

110

83

77

115

86

80.5

120

90

84

125

94

87.5

130

98

91

135

101

94.5

140

105

98

145

109

101.5

150

113

105

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uncleharry58

1/14/2011
i tried cooking my oven fried chicken in my convection oven for the same temp but less time now i bread my chicken with yellow corn meal salt,onoin powder,garlic powder and a little peprika and it was half cooked and half brown any suggestions?

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sleuthagain

1/15/2011
Hi, thanks for the feedback.  Sadly all convection ovens are no created equal and you'll have to do some experimenting to find out what works best for yours.  For example, I have a Dacor convection and a Thermador and they are quite different.  My Dacor cooks quite a lot faster than the Thermador.  That being said, small counter top convections can cook very fast, Oh I have a DeLonghi convection /toaster over and I have decrease the time and temp or things burn easily in that small cavity. If you've not used your oven much, given the feedback you gave I'd just trying using your usual temp and watch carefully.  If the chicken is browning too quickly reduce your temp by 5 degrees.  You just need to monitor it to see what works best for you.  For my Thermador (which I use most of the time) I decrease my temp by 10 degrees and I use the full baking time.  This works well in most all cases.  Ah, and just to make sure.. most ovens can be operated in convection or standard mode so make sure you select the proper mode when setting your oven.

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gwelsh

9/18/2011
I don't get it at all.  I mistakenly set my oven for convection when I was baking some biscuits.  I used a flat cookie sheet (no sides) and the biscuits were an inch apart.  I thought that the oven heated up really fast, but the digital thermostat read 450, as I wanted.  When I opened the door, I didn't get the blast of heat I expect from 450 degrees.  When the baking time of 8 minutes expired, the product was not browning at all.  I had changed the recipe and lowered the temp a bit, so I thought that was responsible.  I set the timer for an additional 2 minutes, then 3 minutes more.  The biscuits still felt like dough.  That's when I looked more closely and noticed that the panel read "convection."  I reset to conventional for 3 minutes and my biscuits rose and browned fine, although they came out kind of grainy-textured.  It seems to me that convection is MUCH slower than conventional. What gives?

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Tips For Cakes And Baking

First Posted: September 18, 2005

Updated: July 19, 2009